Raising Body Confident Kids – Southland Tour

Parents, grandparents, caregivers and anyone who works with children in Tuatapere and Gore – I simply cannot wait for you to meet Emma and for you to hear her share her practical advice on what to say and how to act in order to have raise healthy and happy kids who are confident in their bodies.
WED JUNE 23 – GORE
RSA, 12 Bowler Avenue Gore
THURS JUNE 24 – TUATAPERE*
Waiau Town & Country Club
This talk is for parents of 1 to 18 year olds (and anyone else who needs to show themselves some body confidence love).
Over 90 minutes, you will learn from Emma;
– How to build body confidence in kids
– How to deal with the whole ‘sugar’ thing
– Social media strategies
– How to talk about fat and weight without awkwardness or fear you’re causing issues
– Eating disorder prevention
– how to deal with body size bullying
For just $25, please join Emma and I and discover how to set up your kids to feel good about their body for life.
*Tuatapere – Make a night of it and book your 3 course pre show dinner directly with the Waiau Town & Country Club for just $30

Raising Body Confident Kids – Southland Tour

Parents, grandparents, caregivers and anyone who works with children in Tuatapere and Gore – I simply cannot wait for you to meet Emma and for you to hear her share her practical advice on what to say and how to act in order to have raise healthy and happy kids who are confident in their bodies.
WED JUNE 23 – GORE
RSA, 12 Bowler Avenue Gore
THURS JUNE 24 – TUATAPERE*
Waiau Town & Country Club
This talk is for parents of 1 to 18 year olds (and anyone else who needs to show themselves some body confidence love).
Over 90 minutes, you will learn from Emma;
– How to build body confidence in kids
– How to deal with the whole ‘sugar’ thing
– Social media strategies
– How to talk about fat and weight without awkwardness or fear you’re causing issues
– Eating disorder prevention
– how to deal with body size bullying
For just $25, please join Emma and I and discover how to set up your kids to feel good about their body for life.
*Tuatapere – Make a night of it and book your 3 course pre show dinner directly with the Waiau Town & Country Club for just $30

2020 Gore District Community Awards

In what has been an unforgettable year for all the wrong reasons, tonight’s Gore District Community Awards were a resounding display of community strength and resilience.

The 2020 awards were always going to be different from previous years, given the District has endured one of its worst floods in decades, as well as a global pandemic and the ensuing COVID-19 lockdown.

Gore district events coordinator Mishel Kaaplan said once the Council knew it could actually hold the awards with the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, it was decided to make the evening extra special.

“We still wanted to acknowledge the personal achievements of those in our community.

“However, we also wanted the evening to be about thanking and honouring our local heroes from the February floods, and our essential workers who put their community’s needs ahead of their own in challenging times.“

The awards, held at the Gore Town and Country Club stadium before a capacity crowd of about 500 people, also included a showcase of some of the local events cancelled this year due to COVID-19.

“The organisers of the Hokonui Fashion Design Awards, Tussock Country, Gore Musical Theatre and the Hokonui Culture Feast have gone above and beyond to deliver a visual feast.”

Miss Kaaplan acknowledged the generous sponsorship of long time and new sponsors, given the tough times brought about by COVID-19.

“We wanted to make the awards accessible to everyone. Thanks to our sponsors we were able to offer tickets at under half the price of previous years.”

Gore District Mayor Tracy Hicks said it had been heart-warming to see the community come together for such a celebration after what has been an extremely testing year.

“I am always proud of our District and our people. Tonight has just reaffirmed what a truly amazing place it is we live in.”

The Gore District Community Awards encompasses all sectors of the community, and as such would be one of the few events of its type in New Zealand. Even after so long, it continues to evolve and go from strength to strength, Mr Hicks said.

This year’s award winners were:

  • Anderson Lloyd Contribution to Arts and Culture: Callum Harvey & Steve Hamlin
  • Sport Southland Community Coach of the Year: Mariano Garcia-Nani
  • Soroptimist International of Gore Woman of the Year: Bernadette Hunt
  • JD Souness Young Achiever of the Year: Max Balloch
  • Otago Daily Times & The Ensign Services to Sport: Rochelle Weller
  • Gore Musical Theatre Emerging Performing Artist: Ella Cupit
  • Gore District Mayoral Civic Award recipients: Daryl & Marita Soper

The Gore District Community Awards are sponsored by:

  • Mataura Valley Milk
  • Ian & Annette Tulloch
  • Anderson Lloyd
  • Sport Southland
  • Soroptimist International of Gore
  • JD Souness
  • Otago Daily Times & The Ensign
  • Gore Musical Theatre
  • Lotto NZ
  • Community Trust South
  • Alliance in association with Bidfood Invercargill
  • Villa Maria
  • DB Breweries

Te-Kapehu – New Hub Launched In Gore To Help Business’s And Community Post Covid-19

The Gore District Council has launched a hub to coordinate, support and explore innovative solutions to assist businesses and the community in a post COVID-19 environment.

Seen as a community partnership to navigate the District’s future, the hub has been called
Te Kāpehu. This is the Maori word for compass, a navigational tool for guiding and showing the way.

COVID-19 community recovery taskforce chairman Cr Richard McPhail said there was a nice symmetry between the navigators of the past and the position the province, and much of country, finds itself in today.

“We are all dealing with finding our way in a new environment. While the impact has been
less widespread in our District than elsewhere in the country, we have not been immune.

“In coming months people may find themselves in situations they have never experienced
before. It is essential the Council, businesses and social services are prepared to navigate
the unknown, such as changes in employment levels.”

Te Kāpehu will be located in Gore Visitor Centre’s spacious new location in the former
Salvation Army building. It will be resourced by Gore Visitor Centre staff with support from the Council’s event coordinator.

Cr McPhail acknowledged the work of other support agencies and organisations in the
community, such as Hokonui Huanui. He wanted to assure people Te Kāpehu was not about duplicating their work but supporting it.

“We look at Te Kāpehu as a triage point, a trusted location where staff can determine a
person’s need then refer them to the appropriate business or agency.”

An example would be a displaced worker wanting to start their own business – “we would
refer them to accountants, business banking managers and MBIE”.

Gore District Mayor Tracy Hicks said Te Kāpehu reflect the District’s inherent resilience and care. It was the result of a series of talks with business and community leaders.

“We just want to make sure people don’t fall through the cracks. No-one could have
predicted the year we’ve had so far, and it’s pretty hard right now to predict where we will
be in six or 10 months’ time.”

Mr Hicks said being prepared for whatever the future may bring was important. There may be minimal demand at present for Te Kāpehu’s services, but that could change as the impact of COVID-19 continues to roll out across New Zealand.

The Council has set up a dedicated email address [email protected] and dedicated
phone number 0800 Kapehu (527 348). People were also able to drop in to the visitor
centre.

Pyramid Bridge to Open Ahead Time and Under Budget (watch Video)

Watch the timelapse video below of the bridge construction. The new Pyramid bridge across the Mataura River will be officially opened at a ceremony on Friday 26 June 2020.

The new bridge opens ahead of schedule and more than $2 million under the initial budget in what has been a remarkable project completion despite the setbacks of February’s floods and the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown.

A 50m section of the old bridge was washed away in February 2018, after flooding caused a build-up of debris against the wooden piers.

The new design passed its greatest test when it stood well clear of the February 2020 floodwaters. Gore District Council roading asset manager Peter Standring said “that was our biggest yahoo moment”.

Mr Standring attributed completion of the bridge ahead of time to the efficiencies of the construction team. “It’s quite a feat given the project has had to endure two civil defence emergencies – a flood and a pandemic,’’ he said.

 

An added challenge was that the 15 25.5-metre-long concrete beams were precast in Christchurch and individually trucked slowly to the site on the Riversdale-Pyramid-Otama road, about 5km east of Riversdale.

Gore District Council and Southland District Council collaborated on the project because the Pyramid bridge connects both districts.

Gore District Mayor Tracy Hicks said it was great to have the project finished and be able to deliver a quality product, which he knew the community would be really pleased about.

The bridge also gave certainty around continuity of water supply to the Otama Rural Water Supply Scheme.

Mr Hicks paid tribute to the project management and work of Concrete Structures (NZ) Ltd in delivering the bridge ahead of schedule despite the challenges.

Southland District Mayor Gary Tong said the project had been a very successful collaboration between the two councils, NZ Transport Agency and Concrete Structures.

“Compared with the previous asset we shared with Gore this is a quality bridge that has already been, in part, tested by the flood event in February.

“I am sure that users will be very happy with the bridge,’’ he said.

The opening ceremony will be held at 2pm on Friday on the western side of the bridge. A small convoy of vintage cars will be the first vehicles across the bridge after the ribbon is cut.

Rating Boundary Changes Deferred

The Gore District Council is deferring the introduction of new urban rating boundaries for two years to help ratepayers experiencing financial pressure due to the economic impact of COVID-19 lockdown.

Expansion of Gore and Mataura’s urban rating boundary was a major feature of the Council’s 2018-2028 10-Year-Plan.

It was the first review in 29 years and was prompted by inconsistencies in rating boundaries. After public consultation, the Council decided to have an urban boundary that reflected a property’s environment or use to bring consistency and fairness, as well as ‘future proofing’.

The introduction of the new boundaries was going to mean significant change for some existing rural ratepayers when they move to urban. Consequently, the Council decided to delay implementation to the 2020/21 financial year.

Councillors were this week unanimous in deciding to further defer implementation of the changes, in light of the Covid-19 pandemic crisis and the associated financial pressure it is placing on many households.

Gore District Mayor Tracy Hicks said the Council was still committed to introducing the boundary changes, however there was no compulsion to do it this year.

“Given the challenges confronting people and the responsibility councils have for their community’s overall wellbeing, it was an easy decision to defer the boundary changes.”

The Council was still looking closely at the budgets for the 2020/21 Annual Plan to identify options it may have to reduce spending and bring any rate increase to as low a level as possible, Mr Hicks said.

Gore District Chief Executive Stephen Parry said the rating boundary change was driven by fairness and consistency issues, not the need for additional income.

“Therefore, apart from having these inconsistencies continue for a bit longer, there’s no financial impact on the Council from deferring implementation.”

You can find an accompanying agenda item on the Gore district council website http://www.goredc.govt.nz/assets/documents/meetings/2020/20200512-Council-Meeting-Agenda.pdf

Gore District Economic Recovery

The Gore District is well placed to restart its economy post COVID-19, says Gore District Mayor Tracy Hicks.

His comments come after Zoom meetings this week with about 20 business and community leaders from health, commerce, retail and agricultural. The Council organised the meetings as a way to start the conversation about ensuring businesses are connected and supported.

“By working together we will bounce back from this disaster.

“While there are businesses severely affected by the lockdown, it was heartening to hear from those who are adapting in a challenging environment.”

A common theme was that Gore was as good a place as any, if not better, to recover from the pandemic, Mr Hicks said.

“We have the strength of our agricultural sector and a caring community. Resilience is in our DNA.”

This year has been a real test for business owners and residents with first the flood, in February, and now a pandemic.

“Unfortunately, what we are going through now is not a sprint like the floods, but a marathon.”

Now more than ever, residents need to be loyal and support local. Spending locally has a ripple effect across many sectors, Mr Hicks said.

Retail First managing director Chris Wilkinson said businesses would need to listen to their customers.

“Customer experience is vital, businesses will need to be agile and adaptive in the months and years ahead.”

First Retail has worked closely with local retailers for the last four years on such campaigns as LoveGore ShopLocal – “this is now about all businesses in the Gore District, wherever they are located and whatever product or service they are offering”, he said.

Mr Hicks said there were a number of good ideas to come out of the meetings, including developing a campaign to encourage people to spend local and stay local, and the potential for a GoreBiz Hub in a prominent site in Gore.

“We need people to put their money where their heart is,” he said.

Topp Twins performing at Tussock Country

New Zealand’s well-loved national treasures Jools and Lynda Topp are heading to Tussock Country Music Festival and will perform at the SBS St James Theatre on Friday, 29 May 2020. Topp Twins will bring their original style of merriment, mayhem and mirth to the festival. The Gore’s country hills will be alive with the sound of laughter! 

Armed with guitar, mouth-harp and spoons NZ’s favorite twin sisters change musical style and gender with ease, delivering original country music, character comedy, burlesque innuendo, audience participation and some of the finest yodeling you’ll hear anywhere. 

You can expect the unexpected, so don’t miss a great night of hilarious entertainment. “The Topp Twins will delight the audience of all ages and all walks of life,” says Jeff Rea the chairperson of Tussock Country Music Festival. 

This event is being coordinated by the NZ Songwriters Trust and ticket $50 per person are on sale through www.iticket.co.nz later this week. For more information visit www.tussockcountry.nz 

Gore and Mataura Exposed landfills Update

The Gore District Council is planning on having an interim fix in place by early next week for the old Gore landfill exposed during recent flooding.

The Council has moved quickly to prevent any harmful effects from the old landfill, exposed when floodwaters scoured the banks of the Waikaka Stream, near Hamilton Park.

Work has already started on the immediate actions outlined in a report by one of New Zealand’s leading engineering and design consultancies Harrison Grierson.

Transport Manager Peter Standring said layers of geotextile and geogrid will be placed over the exposed areas to prevent landfill material entering the river and help reduce further bank erosion.

 “Geotextile and geogrid is an inexpensive interim option that we can quickly put in place.” 

Fencing was being put up at Gore to keep people and animals away from the potential unstable sections of the riverbank, and weekly site inspections would be carried out.

“We will also look to remove any visible debris from the stream as soon and as safely as possible.”

Next week a LiDAR survey will be undertaken using a plane flying the affected section of the stream. The survey will provide a complete picture about the extent of the damage and the accuracy of contour data along the stream. 

“The survey will give us a basis for future monitoring and a profile of the exposed areas for any engineering design solutions.”

Harrison Grierson representatives visited the landfill sites at Gore and Mataura last week to make an assessment and identify possible remedial options.

They found the Gore landfill was vulnerable to further erosion and scouring, and requiring immediate interim work. The Mataura site, which is on the banks of the Waimumu Stream near State Highway 1, was comparatively stable and suited to a single, long term solution.

The recommended long term solution for the Gore site was for gabion baskets to be placed along an extended section of the stream to avoid further erosion in another section of the landfill.  

A combination of gabion baskets and filter sock or edge savers was recommended for Mataura. 

The report says both sites may pose an environmental risk to the river and local community. However, there should be further investigations to fully assess those risks and identify actions to mitigate them.

Mr Standring said the Council was committed to minimising the impact on the environment and community.

The Waikaka walkway, at Hamilton Park, has been effected by the scouring and remains closed to the public. 

Gore District Council Moves Quickly On Old Landfill Exposure

The Gore District Council is moving quickly to prevent any harmful effects from the exposure of an old landfill site.

Last week’s floodwaters scoured the banks of the Waikaka Stream, exposing the old Gore landfill, just upstream from Hamilton Park.

General Manager Infrastructure Ramesh Sharma said the Council is aware of the issue and is working closely with Environment Southland and environmental experts to deal with it as quickly and effectively as possible. 

“Our top priority is to stop movement of any landfill material from the site. We are urgently assessing what action is needed both in the short and long term to stabilize the stream banks and prevent any harmful effects,” Mr Sharma said. 

“Some river clean-up will also be needed to remove visible landfill materials. If anyone sees debris that needs to be removed, please contact us on 03 209 0330 so we can deal with it.” 

The old Gore landfill was closed in 2005.

For up-to date information about roads, water supply and what’s happening as we move into recovery please go to our website